Big Ask

We’re living in the Quantum Age, says Brian Clegg

BrianClegg

In his latest book, Brian Clegg looks at how the physics of the very small has transformed our lives.

How to hack your home with Ri Christmas lecturer Danielle George

Prof Danielle George

We catch up with this year’s Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer Danielle George to find out what she has in store for budding young scientists, and what she’ll be doing over the festive period.

Dr Tracy Briggs awarded For Women in Science Fellowship

Tracy Briggs

Dr Tracy Briggs was recently awarded one of four UK & Ireland L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women In Science Fellowships to further her research into the understanding of single-gene disorders that lead to systemic lupus. We find out more

Science and comedy with Robin Ince

Robin Ince Big Ask

Through his stand-up and broadcasting  comedian and all round science enthusiast Robin Ince has done much for the public engagement of science. We caught up with him and threw a few questions his way…

Exploring the smallest of things with Peter Forbes

nanoscience graphene

This month we chat to Peter Forbes, co-author of NanoScience: Giants of the Infinitesimal

Weighing dinosaurs with Dr Roger Benson

Dr Roger Benson

Roger Benson and his colleagues have been ‘weighing’ dinosaurs all in the name of science. We find out more…

Guiliana Noratto says eat three peaches a day

Guiliana Noratto

Washington State University food scientist Guiliana Noratto has found that compounds in peaches can inhibit the growth of breast cancer cells and their ability to spread. Here we learn more about the research, and why she recommends three-a-day

Dr Valery Nesvizhevsky on his serendipitous discovery

Dr Valery Nesvizhevsky, neutron scientist at the ILL in the clean room of the GRANIT spectrometer (GRANIT is also used to look at gravitational quantum states of ultracold neutrons)

Researchers at the Institut Laue Langevin recently made a serendipitous discovery while reviewing 60-year old research into the lifetime of neutrons. They inadvertently stumbled on a new scientific tool to accurately measure the movement of nanoparticles moving along a membrane.

Fred Turner on his homebuilt PCR machine

Fred Turner, Winner of the 2013 National Science + Engineering competition with his homemade PCR machine

Fred Turner, an undergraduate studying biochemistry at the University of Oxford was recently listed in the 100 leading practising scientists – we find out why.

The 1851 Fellowship

Stephen Greenland

Eight young graduates were recently awarded £80,000 each to develop innovative commercial technologies as part of the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851. Here we speak to some of the 2013 Industrial Fellows to see exactly how they plan to use the money…

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